Updates

Powerful Friends: Educational Corruption and Elite Creation in Post-War Bosnia and Herzegovina (2011)

International Research and Exchange Board
2011

Though corruption as a topic can lure one into a potentially vast area of research, this analysis geographically gravitates towards examining corruption in Bosnia and Herzegovina’s higher education. In doing so, this study analyzes a set of structural elements, procedures, and behaviors within the country’s higher education that have jointly created an encouraging space for the increasing and self-serving utilization of higher education by the country’s post-war elite. Of the particular interest is this elite’s impact on the forms of educational corruption, which have shifted away from standard bribing processes and moved towards more complex favor reciprocation networks.

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Internationalization in the Educational System of a Weak State: Examining Multiple Identities of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Higher Education (2009)

Intercultural Education Journal
2009

Abstract: Higher education has often acted as the nucleus of progressive thought, the instigator of societal transformation, and the center of cultural exchange and understanding. However, in conflict‐ridden societies, higher‐education systems have shown a proclivity towards the multiple personality syndrome: their ability to solidify, connect and unite diverse communities within a society is almost always juxtaposed with higher education’s tendency to separate, regionalize and exclude. This analysis scrutinizes the globalizing and ‘EU‐nionizing’ forces and values as they collide with the local tensions, traditions and identities presently existing in the higher education of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

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Transitional Justice and DDR: The Case of Bosnia and Herzegovina (2009)

International Center for Transitional Justice, Research Unit
2009

The Bosnian war left a legacy of horrific crimes and human rights violations committed mainly against civilians. As part of the Dayton Peace Agreement (DPA), and in an effort to assure a peaceful transition out of violence, the ethnic armies in Bosnia and Herzegovina were scaled down, with the demobilization of nearly 300,000 soldiers. This study discusses DDR process, highlighting the demobilization of the armies and the involvement of the international community in creating unified and multiethnic armed forces. With a focus on international courts, vetting and reparations programs, the paper goes on to explore the transitional justice measures in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Finally, the analysis looks at the lacking linkages and absent coordination between the DDR and transitional justice initiatives and ends by providing a few viable recommendations for bridging the existing gap between the two arenas in Bosnia and beyond.

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